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Which Outdoor Antenna is Best for My Cell Signal?

Use this guide to select an antenna that will give you the best cellular reception inside of your home, office, vehicle or RV, or warehouse.

When installing a cell signal booster to remedy your weak cell signal, there are a couple of key decisions that will impact the performance of your kit. There are only three components to a signal booster kit; an outdoor antenna, an indoor antenna, and the booster. Selecting the most fitting option for each is important to getting the biggest boost for your buck.

This post will give you the information you need to select the best outdoor antenna for you.

First-Thing-First: What Are the Options

Criteria #1: Cell Signal Strength Outside of the Building

The strength of your cellular signal at any one point outside of your property is a clear identifier of the antenna you will need. For spaces up to 25,000 square feet you can test your signal strength by entering field test mode on your phone. For larger applications, we suggest using an RF Signal Meter.

Criteria #2: More than One Cellular Carrier

Depending on your need to support one cell carrier or multiple carriers, you will want to move ahead with different outdoor antennas.

Criteria #3: Number of Antennas on Your Roof

Creating separation between other antennas you have installed on your roof can make a big difference in the level of performance you see from your cell phone signal booster.

Criteria #4: Space Between Outdoor & Indoor Antennas

When you have two antennas arranged too close together, this can cause interference, which will negatively affect the performance you receive from your signal booster.

Summary

The ideal application for an omni-directional antenna would be to have a -0 to -90 dBm signal outside of the building, a need to improve a weak signal for multiple carriers, more than 30-feet of space on your roof from other antennas, and 50-feet of separation between your indoor and outdoor antennas.

The ideal application for a directional antenna would be to have a -91 to -135 dBm signal outside of the building, a need to improve a weak signal for only one carrier, less than 30-feet of space on your roof from other antennas, and 30-feet of separation between your indoor and outdoor antennas.

Keep in mind that these are ideal applications and, in most cases, the signal strength outside of the home, office, commercial space, or building will be the most indicative of the antenna best suited for you. Still have questions? Contact an install expert.

 

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